You are what you look like

March 23, 2007 at 11:00 am (bizzare)

Look at somebody’s face. Their every feature, the whole of their look. And try to think what they are like as a person before talking to them.
Chances are, they will turn out to act the way that they look. Their personality seems to mimic their appearance in some way.

People seem to act the way they think they look in the mirror. We are self conscious beings, and I believe when we look in the mirror we have some sort of inbuilt mechanism that sets up a certain set of behavioral characteristics to go along with ones look.

If you have big eyes, with that sort of hope and sparkle in them, that will give you a certain set of behavioral characteristics.
Likewise, if you have a masculine jaw structure that will give you yet another set of behavioral characteristics. And so on.
I think this can only develop as we are growing up into adults. As I don’t believe you can have a nose job and then you’ll start acting differently. No no no, it must happen just after the age of becoming self aware and develop until puberty.

Take the next week to notice this around you. I think you’ll find that I have a good point…

And going back to my statement, you can look at somebody and sort of know what they are like as a person.

Let me know what you guys think – but please don’t reply if you have not yet tried to see the patterns.

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16 Comments

  1. Ignatius said,

    There definitely is something to first impressions, if one was continuously approached by those with a similar prexsisting profile of them it likely has a shaping effect but then again one might surround themselves with those that view them as they desire to be viewed causing other to view the one the same as the group the one chose. Im sensing a chicken and the egg paradox

    what causes one to become self aware and also go through puberty? I do not see a reason for a ridged boundry at those points

    caveat emptor, this can lead to very wrong conclusions

  2. Ignatius said,

    the effect to which i referred can undoubtly be restrained from its most obvious direction to assume not would be overly simplistic and to assume its initial properties have no bearing on the outcome is naive my friend.

    Simply put, your post is of a kind that is wrong in the same way assuming the society in which we live has no effect on us

    you hold a BA in Philosophy & Psychology, thats respectable, congratulations.
    Am I to assume that means you are in a state of irreconcilable correct, those degrees hopefully encouraged openness to others reason

  3. anna chadwick said,

    Didn’t Oscar Wilde say something like: ‘Only shallow people don’t judge by appearances’?

    I think there’s plenty to argue in favour appearances but there are far too many exceptions to make it a rule.

  4. epilogas said,

    Nobody likes to be worst. So they think about things they are good at, while forgeting things they are bad at. But to feel superior, one doesn’t need to be superior.

    Feel of insult arises from inferiority complex. The response is acusing somebody being narrowminded, insensitive, stupid, not fun, boring, incapable… , e.g. bad.

    Appearance shows genetic desposition or potencial, rather than actual character, wich was influanced by condicions of life. It has more to do with evolution and anthropology, rather than sociology.

    Appearance influence our subconscios and instincts. Society and conscious part of us can try to deny differences for the benefit of many. Or highlite differences for the benefit of few.

  5. EcceQuiTollisPeccataMundi said,

    the effect to which i referred can undoubtly be restrained from its most obvious direction to assume not would be overly simplistic and to assume its initial properties have no bearing on the outcome is naive my friend.

    Well, me amicus, I see no relevance in the sociological aspect of operant conditioning given in a society to suggest that aesthetic appearence holds any bearing on the content or lack thereof of an individual in a society that necessarily advocated individualism; that being said, one can easily make a Hawthorne Effect conjecture with respect to your conjecture. Further, the very fact that I have attained those degrees’ allows me to suggest the fact that there is always an exception to the rule. The salient point being that one cannnot make sweeping generalizations about the the character, aptitude or quality of a person based solely on the appearence or aesthetic preferences of x person.

    There are many anecdotes which imply my point, namely: you can’t judge a book by its cover; and, as Twain might say of the matter, “it is better to keep your mouth shut and people think you a fool than to open it and remove all doubt.”

    Respectfully,

    Ecce.

  6. Ignatius said,

    EcceQuiTollisPeccataMundi

    “I see no relevance in the sociological aspect of operant conditioning given in a society to suggest that aesthetic appearence holds any bearing on the content or lack thereof of an individual in a society that necessarily advocated individualism”

    well I would sure hope you didn’t see relevance and still come to the conclusion it was irrelevant

    I did not suggest one could make “sweeping generalizations” I said the one (your looks) has an effect on the other (who you are). The degree to which this can and has been exploited for any means is not what I was discussing, if that intrests you researching profiling should be helpful

    are you seriously suggesting that there is nothing to be learned from looking at someone. rethink

  7. veil said,

    spearo wrote:
    Didn’t Oscar Wilde say something like: ‘Only shallow people don’t judge by appearances’?

    so true

  8. nagase said,

    So, I suppose Socrates’ ugly appearance betrays a foul heart and a defective intellect? What about Stephen Hawking? And, given their similitude, should I conclude that Hitler was actually a very good comedian and that Chaplin was a ruthless dictator in disguise? 😦

  9. veil said,

    Nagase wrote:
    So, I suppose Socrates’ ugly appearance betrays a foul heart and a defective intellect? What about Stephen Hawking? And, given their similitude, should I conclude that Hitler was actually a very good comedian and that Chaplin was a ruthless dictator in disguise?

    stephen hawking looks like a genius, hitler looked intolerant, chaplin looked clownish. Hitler had dark and angular eyes. Chaplin had goofy more rounded eyes. There are no simple rules to follow and judging dead people like this would be impossible. Most of it has to do with the luster in their eyes, their facial gestures, their posture, their outfits and the general vibe they give off. In my teens I was always wrong, but as I’ve come to know more and more people intimately, my general first impression of a person is usually about right.

  10. dannielle said,

    Well, if you’re dressed like a yob, yeah, in those circumstances you’re pretty much right.

    Hawking looks physically disabled, and can even look at appearance to also be mentally disabled, so I don’t think he looks like a genius.

  11. epilogas said,

    One can’t lie about his/her appearance.

    Some people look out of place in some circumstances.

    It is better to learn lessons life teaches you and go where you are supposed to be, than ignore them.

  12. marsh cohen said,

    😉 i disagree with that somehow.yet at aome points,you might be considered correct otherwise

  13. the boss said,

    I think Oscar Wilde’s quote has been misinterpreted over the years. Not everything has to be taken literally people!

  14. veil said,

    the boss wrote:
    I think Oscar Wilde’s quote has been misinterpreted over the years. Not everything has to be taken literally people!

    I don’t care who said it or what his original intention was. I just think that this quote rings true the way it’s written above.

    I think this post’s original intention was to say that what we look like effects who we become as a person, and not that we start to look like the person we are?

    Taking myself as an example, I used to be very skinny, a little feminine and goofy looking as a kid. I would be the class clown woody allen type, the guy with the strange clothes etc. and would even start to doubt my sexuality, when others suggested I looked gay. But as I got older and started to build some muscles, manlier face, got a beard etc. I became more of the quiet manly guy. I’m not sure to what extent it is me looking in the mirror and acting accordingly or other peoples response to me that has affected this change. I still feel like the same person and I always try to be myself whatever that even means. I feel like there are so many different aspects of who I am that both the clown persona and the quiet guy feels perfectly befitting.

    I imagine that somebody who doesn’t transform, who’s always categorized one specific way all the time will have a more focused identity.

  15. dannielle said,

    the boss wrote:
    I think Oscar Wilde’s quote has been misinterpreted over the years. Not everything has to be taken literally people!

    Maybe an attack on the aristocracy?

  16. the boss said,

    geeeeeeeeeeeez!

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